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May 22 2012
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PDD

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Getting ahead of the Olympics – My idea for an easier commute

There are less than 100 days to go to the London 2012 Olympics and us Londoners are already starting to see the impact it will have on our day to day life and especially our commute. In this post, our senior designer Marcelle imagines how we could all get through it much easier.


Image Credit: EG Focus, Flickr Creative Commons

Transport for London teamed up with the Mayor’s office and launched a campaign with matching website – getaheadofthegames.com. Over the last few weeks we have been bombarded by their posters, adverts and newspaper articles that warn us the roads and especially public transport will be much busier than usual.

 


Image Credit: PDD

TfL recently revealed a ‘hot spot’ planning map on getaheadofthegames.com, which aims to assist those people attending the Games venues for events as well as those going into the capital for work. The map depicts the expected impact of the Games, shown at day-by-day and half-hour intervals, with many Zone 1 and 2 stations described as ‘exceptionally busy’ or ‘busier than usual’.

 


Image credit: gettingaheadofthegames.com

Of course the infrastructure of the London underground is always a ‘work in progress’ and TfL are doing their best to make things work, but this event will, more than ever, highlight the weaker points of TfL’s service and product design.

There are many examples to be found when simply considering the ticketing system – fumbling with the Oyster card at the barriers, realising at the barrier that there is not enough money on it, followed by endless queuing at the ticket machines. Besides this, many of the visitors will be using the system for the first time, not knowing how much money they need on the card for travel…

 


Image Credit: PDD

 


Image Credit: PDD

 


Image Credit: © Transport for London 2005

So what does TfL do to address these issues…. they bring out a Jubilee Oyster card. I believe they could have done better.

 


Image credit: www.tfl.gov.uk/oyster

TfL still has time to implement my Oyster bracelet with the same RFID technology as the card. This will enable the Olympic fans to wear it all the time and prevent fumbling at the barrier.

 


Image Credit: PDD

We know that the needs of people using an Oyster card during the Olympics will differ from the normal commuting crowd. The stadiums are located in zone 3, which means people are likely to travel daily within zone 1-3, mixing tourism, hotel stay with Olympic visits. They’ll also stay in town for 1 to 3 weeks, making it easier for TfL to target a special pre-charged Oyster to this audience.

 


Image Credit: PDD

The bracelets can be colour coded according to different Top-Up amounts and zone access. This could make Olympic visitors easily recognisable so they can go through fast lane open barriers, without having to check-in or out.

 


Image Credit: PDD

If they wanted to, TfL could bring out other variants, making the Olympic 2012 Oyster a purposeful collectable. The bracelets could be sold at TfL pop up sales booths in tube stations, train stations and Olympic venues.

 


Image Credit: PDD

So TfL, there is still some time left…

 

Image Credit: PDD

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Posted by PDD
@pddinnovation

Languages spoken: Global.
The last thing that inspired me: Design and Innovation.
My dream project: A project that makes a difference in the world.
My obsession: Develop successful, award-winning and world-first products and experiences.

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