Opinions

Using Multisensory Design to Improve Human Experience

How do colour, smell, texture and sound affect how you experience and interact with products and services?

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The benefits of using Computational Fluid Dynamics as a tool for innovation

Alex Hanson discusses the benefits of using PDD’s Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) packages as a powerful tool for creativity and exploration throughout the design process.

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What is design thinking?

At PDD, we get asked this question a lot. What is Design thinking? So here is a brief summary of what it means and the benefits it could have to your organisation.

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Top tips from Jamie Buckley on how graduates can impress a recruiter…

Jamie Buckley, Creative Director, features in the New Design Magazine Graduate Showcase 2017 supplement and offers advice on how to impress a recruiter.

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Learning from real world use – complementing medical device experience databases through analysis of social media

An extract taken from Chris Vincent’s knowledge piece that discusses the growing use of digital platforms such as social media to understand how people really use medical products.

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The role of a moderator in Human Factors studies…

It may sound strange to say it but the role of a moderator, in my opinion, is to be a bit of a Chameleon. And a few acting skills don’t go amiss either! Let me explain…

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Human Factors: The importance of exposure to the end user

When previously working as a design engineer for a medical device manufacturer I was not always exposed to the end user of the device I was developing. Due to the pressure on resources, time required to arrange testing or the complexity of negotiating hospital access this activity was frequently put on hold.

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Patient Centred Design – Is the Pharma industry playing catch up?

The consumer goods sector (FMCG, apparel, automotive, electronics) has always had greater freedom to explore design research in comparison to the Pharma industry, which is significantly more restricted. One of the problems with a stricter and more constrained set of rules is that it can curb innovation by creating limitations in the approach Pharma companies take during the development process and justification for when Patient Centred Design comes into debate. Often regulatory walls can slow the development of a new products and services and directly affect the time taken to introduce a new product to market.

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Alternate worlds – What can pharma learn from other industries?

In my recent blog post on patient-centricity, I highlighted that the pharma industry has over the past years embarked on a journey towards more patient-centricity and that this trend actually has broad support across key players. At the same time, even with the best of intentions, it will take time for this new ethos to be truly embedded in the business practices of all pharma companies.

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How patient-centric is the pharma industry?

In this first post of a three-part series, I look at the state of patient-centricity in the pharma industry today. In recent times, the pharma industry has increasingly adopted the mantra of“patient-centricity” which aims to put the patient at the heart of the company’s operation. The reality, however, still looks very different. Many are quick […]

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The future of 3D printing for medical applications: Additive manufacturing opportunities realised

The hype surrounding 3D printing has swelled substantially in the past few years, largely driven by accessible design platforms, customisation and distributed manufacturing. While aesthetic design applications can be fascinating in their own right, are all of the functional benefits of 3D printing technologies receiving the attention they deserve?

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The Role of Human-Centred Design in Healthcare Reform and Transformation

All too often our health care is taken for granted, and we assume it will always be available to serve our community’s needs. The question is “How healthy are our healthcare facilities to handle the diversity of services and to produce healthy outcomes for an expansive and unprecedented market of six (6) living generations – all distinctively different with a diverse set of needs and priorities?”

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“Measuring usability”: The siren song of quantitative reasoning

How do you measure usability? How do you really measure the efficiency of interface characteristics and user satisfaction in a way that can feed opportunities to develop and innovate? As a usability consultant, it is not that uncommon to be asked to evaluate usability. Some would even go so far as to say it comes with the territory.

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Innovation trends in Pharma and Medtech

Earlier this week, I attended an event at Imperial College on Innovation in Medtech. The event was well attended by academics and a diverse group of industry representatives from pharma and medical device companies, start-ups, consultancies and investors.

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Why we need better UI in Professional Medical Devices

As a follow on from my previous blog, with more technology being used to treat patients, user interface (UI) design is key to making devices safe and effective. Patients aren’t the only ones who need good UIs however, Health Care Professionals (HCPs) are more reliant than ever on technology to do their job and this is only set to rise. They – more than most – need informative, error proof UIs especially considering errors kill 12,000 patients a year in the UK and no doubt cause complications for many more. Here are a few design recommendations tailored to designing devices with the needs of health care professionals in mind.

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Top tips on ‘Employment for Graduates’

This year the Product Design and Innovation Conference reached its fifth year. It provides a place for designers and manufacturers to meet and discuss innovation and the product design industry. This year there were talks from; Design Partners, TEAMS Design, Chauhan Studio, BAC Mono, McLaren Technology Centre, Lenovo, Bacardi Global Brands, Kinneir Dufort, Speedo Aqualab, Whipsaw Ltd. to name a few of the 33 companies that the speakers were representing.

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Mash up: Human-Centred Design & Business Model Canvas

A few weeks ago I posted a mash-of Larry Keeley’s Ten Types of Innovation and Alexander Osterwalder’s and Yves Pigneur’s Business Model Canvas (BMC).

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The future toilet: Impromptu hygiene enforcement

Not the most dignified choice of topics, admittedly, but this is something that has either fascinated or mentally scarred me. I am going to share with you my experience of the ‘futuristic public toilet’, or to be more technically correct an ‘automated toilet.’ It was situated on the South Island of New Zealand by the Fox Glaciers. I was on a guided tour and we had long bus journeys with regular stops at public toilets and more importantly somewhere to get our morning coffee!

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Can you teach an old brain new tricks?

Heart failure, Stroke, Cancer, Dementia, Malaria, Bird Flu or even Ebola – take your pick from the latest challenges in world health. Each account of these relative pandemics sweeping societies across the globe allude to being your next arch enemy, ‘the one you need to watch out for’. At the time of writing this blog, five of the major newspapers featured health related headlines including ‘Dementia patients cut loose’, ‘500,000 denied cancer drug’, ‘Statins health risk’, and ‘Superbugs will send us to the dark ages’ – it is clear that health is high on the public radar.

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‘Just around the Vend’ – Human Factors and Usability of Vending Machines

As a human factors and usability consultant I talk about usability a lot, unfortunately – but also understandably – most people do not share my enthusiasm; that is, until I apply it to something they find absolutely infuriating. This can range from tin openers to a local council website, whatever it may be it puts the problem in context. There’s one particular product that I find most people have a problem with, a product that irritates me so much that I will join in any conversation involving it. Admittedly there aren’t very many of these conversations, but they’re almost always focused on the criticism of usability; let’s see if you agree.

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